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Couple of Shavin House photos
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DavidC



Joined: 02 Sep 2006
Posts: 3352
Location: Oak Ridge, TN

PostPosted: Mon Mar 17, 2008 1:55 pm    Post subject: Couple of Shavin House photos Reply with quote

Took a ride past the Shavin House (Chattanooga, TN - 1950) yesterday and took two pictures from the car:






Here's a Storrer exterior picture of the home:




And his plan - aligned to fit the above pictures:




And here are a couple of interior photos, also from Storrer's "Companion":




Dining Area


This beautiful home sits near the top of Missionary Ridge (famous for a battle during the Civil War). And thanks to being close to the edge of the bluff, the northerly terrace-end of the home has a commanding view of the wide-open valley below.


And, according to a post by 'Education Professor' from last year, Mrs. Shavin still resides there.



David

P.S. - I remember seeing a post (not sure if here or another site) with recent photos of Shavin, including interiors. Anyone have the link?
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 9267
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Mon Mar 17, 2008 4:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks, David -- good stuff. Another of the 'fifties "steep-sloped" roofs. I wonder what these feel like inside; they seem a little odd or "forced" to me, when I see photos of them. Did he feel that a proper contrast to the flat-roofed portion could only be a dramatically steep pitch ?

Thanks for the images and links ! (Orienting the plan to the pictures is a worthwhile move, I think.)

SDR
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Education Professor



Joined: 05 Jul 2005
Posts: 579

PostPosted: Mon Mar 17, 2008 11:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I believe Mrs. Shavin still lives in the home..............
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DavidC



Joined: 02 Sep 2006
Posts: 3352
Location: Oak Ridge, TN

PostPosted: Tue Mar 18, 2008 1:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here's a link to some photos of the Shavin House taken last year (though this is not the more extensive set I am remembering seeing online - somewhere).

The Living Area end of the house shares (to my eye) similarities with Peterson Cottage (i.e. - steep-sloped roof meeting a relatively flat masonry area behind, though at Peterson this area is the entire width of the rear structure. Very similar overall masonry work on both, too).

Storrer also mentions that this is one of the few Wright homes that is situated on the top of it's hill - rather than set into the side.


David
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DavidC



Joined: 02 Sep 2006
Posts: 3352
Location: Oak Ridge, TN

PostPosted: Tue Mar 18, 2008 1:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

A, HA!!!

Just found the photo set I was thinking of:

Shavin House Slideshow


David
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DavidC



Joined: 02 Sep 2006
Posts: 3352
Location: Oak Ridge, TN

PostPosted: Tue Mar 18, 2008 2:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Also noticed just how much the dining chairs at Shavin.....

(picture from Storrer's "Companion")

..... look like the ones from Mossberg:


(Thomas Heinz "FLW: Interiors and Furniture", pg 205)


Heinz goes on to say that these 'armchairs' were "(f)irst seen at Taliesin in the late 20's, this chair has a trim appearance. The plywood panels on the side keep the frame square and resist force. The angle of the top rail is set at an angle which supports the back on a flat level.".


They also strike me as being similar in appearance (design "cousins", perhaps?) to the dining chairs from the Willey House (1934). See pgs 8-10 of this PDF file from the Willey House Restoration Journal.


David
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 9267
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Tue Mar 18, 2008 3:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

My grand unified theory: Everything is Somewhere.

This sentence has no recognizable meaning -- to me:

"The angle of the top rail is set at an angle which supports the back on a flat level."



SDR
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Ed Jarolin



Joined: 03 Apr 2006
Posts: 277
Location: Wyoming

PostPosted: Tue Mar 18, 2008 3:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
"The angle of the top rail is set at an angle which supports the back on a flat level."

I'm guessing this should say something like, "the top of the stiles (verticals) are cut at an angle which firmly supports the seatback at that angle." The sentence likely had no meaning to the proofreader either, but as long as the spelling and grammar were ok it passed through. One would think authors would go over their text with a fine tooth comb to avoid this kind of thing. Either that or Heinz doesn't know the difference between a rail and a stile.
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 9267
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Tue Mar 18, 2008 4:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks. I think you must have it right.

I've found a number of less noticeable errors in the technical portions of the otherwise excellent and irreplaceable writings of Esther McCoy, who chronicled vital portions of American West Coast modernism, as it was unfolding. As a drafter for Schindler and later for Gregory Ain (if I have it right) she was able to give us the "inside dope"; only her own apparently inadequate proofing leaves intact certain silly transpositions and other numerical errors that mar the work. Your analysis here echos that problem and its understandable causes.

Thanks for that excellent PDF on the Willey restoration. (There's an error of terminology there, too; the individual pieces of veneer are "leaves"; the matched batch of them is a flitch.)

Here are two dramatic interior shots of Willey as they appear in Wright's "The Natural House," showing the chairs:


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Ed Jarolin



Joined: 03 Apr 2006
Posts: 277
Location: Wyoming

PostPosted: Tue Mar 18, 2008 5:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

SDR- For my own edification, is the vertical extension of a rear chair leg which supports the seatback actually called a stile? I assume the terminology used for doors would apply here, but can't say that I really know for sure.

On the subject of proofreading errors, or things lost in translation, I recently read "The Presence of the Case Study Houses" and since the authors' wrote it in French the translated version had it's share of awkward, if amusing, turns of phrase. A nice book, though I wouldn't pay the list price if I could avoid it.
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 9267
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Tue Mar 18, 2008 7:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Although my dictionary says a stile is a "vertical piece in a panel or frame, as of a door or window," I would (and do) stretch its use to include a wider variety of vertical members. As you suggest, Mr Heinz may have confused stile and rail; I remind myself of the correct term by equating "rail" with "horizontal," as in fence rail or railroad track.

In the case of this chair, it's a little hard to know which of those rear members is a "leg" and which isn't. Both, maybe ?

(Note also the difference between *it's* and *its*, above. The Apostrophe Police decided at some point that *it's* would be the contraction of *it is*, leaving the possessive (its) without an apostrophe -- think of *yours* or *hers*.)

SDR
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ozwrightfan



Joined: 13 Aug 2007
Posts: 160
Location: Sydney Australia

PostPosted: Tue Mar 18, 2008 9:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The angle of the armrests on the oragami chairs where they attach to the sides seem to be a much sharper angle than I remember seeing on other photographs. The one on the chair on the left even appears to be hinged!
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MHOLUBAR



Joined: 03 Mar 2006
Posts: 132
Location: Oberlin, Ohio

PostPosted: Wed Mar 19, 2008 8:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Not only do the Shavin and Mossberg chairs look like the chairs at Willey but the Willey chairs seem to be a direct translation form the Gerrtit Ritvelt 'Berlin ' chair, or one of his constuctivist creations. Thank you for the wonderfull photos, it is really helping me assemble a little of this 'chair' history. The origami chair listed above seems to have a little moire that makes the highlight look like a hinge, a side efffect of making these files small enough to download (I suspect).
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mholubar
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 9267
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Wed Mar 19, 2008 5:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Berlin Chair, 1923

Highback Chair, 1919

It's hard to find an close relative among Rietveld's chairs, but there is certainly a Constructivist flavor to the Wright chairs we're looking at above.


There are almost as many variants among the Origami Chairs as there are extant examples ! But the textured line mentioned is no doubt the photo-pixillated edge of the upholstered side panel. . .

SDR
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DavidC



Joined: 02 Sep 2006
Posts: 3352
Location: Oak Ridge, TN

PostPosted: Wed Mar 19, 2008 5:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

ozwrightfan wrote:
The angle of the armrests on the origami chairs where they attach to the sides seem to be a much sharper angle than I remember seeing on other photographs. The one on the chair on the left even appears to be hinged!


If you are referring to the Storrer picture above, it's definitely the graininess of the copied b&w photo.


Here is a color close-up picture taken last year of one of the same pair of chairs.

And here is another picture from the same set, similar to the Storrer one above and showing both Origami chairs.


David
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